Tag Archives: review
Album Of The Week: Krimewatch Krimewatch

How long does an album have to be to qualify as an album? The self-titled debut from the New York punk band Krimewatch is 12 minutes long. I can name plenty of EPs that are longer than that. I can name plenty of songs that are longer than that — songs from punk bands, even. More »

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Source: https://www.stereogum.com/1991637/album-of-the-week-krimewatch-krimewatch/franchises/album-of-the-week/

Eminem: The Marshall Mathers LP

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Each Sunday, Pitchfork takes an in-depth look at a significant album from the past, and any record not in our archives is eligible. Today, we explore Eminem’s monumental album The Marshall Mathers LP.

Source: https://pitchfork.com/reviews/albums/eminem-the-marshall-mathers-lp

Wet – “Softens”

Last month, Wet shared “There’s A Reason,” the first single from their sophomore album and the first song to be credited to the band as a duo, consisting only of Kelly Zutrau and Joe Valle. There’s no concrete details on their follow-up to 2016’s Don’t You just yet, but there is another single. More »

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Source: https://www.stereogum.com/1991266/wet-softens/music/

Album of the Day: WRONG, “Feel Great”

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The music that WRONG play feels intentionally unfashionable: think muscular riffs and a hurly-burly attitude that recall the angular skronking of ‘90s Amphetamine Reptile bands. The riffs chug and stop, the balance is askew—all the better to evoke creeping dread—and vocals are sung-spoken-shouted, conjuring up the dynamic and unsettling style of Unsane, Helmet, and Quicksand. It’s noise rock with a cacophonous simplicity, short-blast songs that binge and purge on hatred. For a more current reference: WRONG sip from the same murky pool as Canadian weirdos KEN mode.

Building on the crushing alt-punk foundations of their 2016 debut, WRONG inject slightly more melody and variance into Feel Great. There’s no progressive noodling or joyous soaring that you might expect from a project featuring current and former members of Torche and Kylesa. Instead, it’s a straightforward onslaught of noise. “Nice Job” is two minutes of gloriously jarring guitars beside buried, drawn-out shouts. “Upgrade” takes the thesis of “Nice Job” and lives true to its namesake. “Anaerobic” is a tribute to being fucked up which strangely (and suitably) concludes the album with a Stomp-style clattering of drums so muffled and dissonant they sound like pots and pans. Delightfully literal and gruff, WRONG make a virtue of direct attack.

-Sarah Kitteringham

Source: https://daily.bandcamp.com/2018/04/13/wrong-feel-great-review/

Sorority Noise wrapped up last US tour before hiatus (Bowery Ballroom pics)

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The NYC show also included tourmates Remo Drive and Jelani Sei.

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Source: http://www.brooklynvegan.com/sorority-noise-wrapped-up-last-us-tour-before-hiatus-bowery-ballroom-pics/

Album of the Day: Wye Oak, “The Louder I Call, The Faster It Runs”

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Wye Oak have consistently found ways to push the limitations inherent in being a duo. On 2014’s Shriek, lead vocalist Jenn Wasner, typically on guitar, switched to bass, creating an icy, sparse framework for her songs. Andy Stack drums with one hand, using the other to play a wide variety of synths. (In their new touring lineup, those duties will be Will Hackney.) On The Louder I Call, The Faster It Runs, Wye Oak’s music finds emotional heft in small moments and nuanced sounds. Yet it is unmistakably Wye Oak: sturdy indie pop, chock full of inventive melodies and dramatic crescendos. “Symmetry,” for instance, sneaks in a spiky synthesizer that sounds lifted from a zombie carnival. On the album’s title track, Stack incorporates skittish drums that create a perfect backdrop for Wasner’s urgent, multi-tracked vocals, which are as distorted as Dali figures. Later, her guitar solo in “Lifer” gushes to life unexpectedly, like a tidal wave.

These captivating, unsettling details serve to reinforce Wasner’s sharp portraits of malaise and self-doubt. “Oh, hard heart, do you know yourself?” she asks on “Symmetry,” echoing the opening line of 2011’s “Civilian”: “I am nothing without pretend.” If the album has a focal point, it’s “It Was Not Natural.” Over a menacing piano line that recalls Radiohead’s “A Punchup at a Wedding,” and an improbably snappy beat, Wasner discovers a treasure, “seemingly foreign, but somehow still it is familiar.” It’s a poignant summation of her unease, but it could just as easily read as the mission statement for a band that continues to evolve.

Max Savage Levenson

Source: https://daily.bandcamp.com/2018/04/09/wye-oak-the-louder-i-call-the-faster-it-runs-review/

The Walking Dead season 8 episode 15: Carl's letters to Rick and Negan revealed – full transcript

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Chandler Riggs returned in a voiceover role for the penultimate episode of season 8

Source: http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/tv/news/the-walking-dead-season-8-episode-15-carl-letter-rick-negan-full-transcript-a8295721.html

Nils Frahm turns solo piano into serrated techno, and back again

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Few musicians can take the simple act of walking across a stage and imbue it with as much meaning as Nils Frahm.

The German pianist and composer divided the stage in two at the Immanuel Presbyterian Church in Koreatown on Saturday. On the left, he had a piano and a few vintage keyboards, all at…

Source: http://www.latimes.com/la-et-ms-nils-frahm-review-20180408-story.html

Everyone is terrified to eat popcorn during ‘A Quiet Place’

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Keep your popcorn, and your Whoppers, and your crunchy-as-hell nachos out of the movie theater this weekend. Please. 

John Krasinski’s thriller A Quiet Place debuted Friday and has stunned movie goers into stomach-grumbling silence. The film’s plot (no spoilers) revolves around a young family’s effort to survive in a world taken over by sound-sensitive monsters who hunt by noise. 

SEE ALSO: John Krasinski’s ‘A Quiet Place’ is brutally effective white-knuckle horror

The storyline means much of the film is nerve-wrackingly silent, amplifying every real-life sound. That has left every person who ordered theater food terrified that a monster is going to rip their face off. And left every person sitting next to someone chomping on popcorn very annoyed.  Read more…

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Source: https://mashable.com/2018/04/08/a-quiet-place-food/?utm_campaign=Mash-Prod-RSS-Feedburner-All-Partial&utm_cid=Mash-Prod-RSS-Feedburner-All-Partial

Johnny Cash: American Recordings

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Each Sunday, Pitchfork takes an in-depth look at a significant album from the past, and any record not in our archives is eligible. Today, we explore Johnny Cash’s 1994 comeback American Recordings.

Source: https://pitchfork.com/reviews/albums/johnny-cash-american-recordings

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