Showing all posts by Indie Brew.
Person of the Year: Time honours abuse ‘silence breakers’

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Women who broke silence on sexual harassment and abuse have been named as Time's Person of the Year.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-42254219

Colin Kaepernick accepts Muhammad Ali sports award from Beyonce

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The American football player says he'll "continue to work for the people, with or without the NFL's platform".

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/articles/42251661

MeToo hijacked black women’s work on race and gender equality

In 1975, a payroll clerk at the US Environmental Protection Agency named Paulette Barnes sued the agency when she was fired for refusing a boss’s advances. A year later, a former US Justice Department employee named Diane Williams filed a claim against her ex-employers for the same reason. They won their cases, paving the way for the Supreme Court’s unanimous 1986 decision that sexual harassment was a violation of the Civil Rights Act—the result of a case brought by a third black woman, Mechelle Vinson, against the bank where her former supervisor harassed and raped her repeatedly over several years.

Five years later, law professor Anita Hill’s testimony about Clarence Thomas’s lewd behavior as her boss brought the term “sexual harassment” into public discourse and gave millions of women the ability to name the abuse they had endured.

And in the wake of the initial accusations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein, the hashtag #MeToo—the name of a movement launched 10 years earlier by writer and activist Tarana Burke, also a black woman—helped to harness collective outrage into a force that is reshaping workplaces around the country.

Those notable efforts are on top of the work of civil rights activists from the members of Working Women United, an advocacy group that spoke out against harassment in the 1970s, to the activists of Black Lives Matter, who highlighted the structural oppression and aggressions large and small underpinning the discussion on harassment today.

This moment is the result of the collective labor of women of color who turned private agonies into public battles on behalf of justice. As overdue and welcome as this reckoning feels, there’s also the unsettling reality that a movement built largely on the labor of women of color has been co-opted by a discussion that prioritizes the experiences of victims who are white, wealthy, and privileged over those who are not.

Racism and sexism are inextricably intertwined. Navigating a biased system exacts a toll, from lost career opportunities to the energy expended on internal calculations for dealing with inappropriate behavior and self-doubt. Many writers, activists, and scholars have worked tirelessly to highlight the cumulative impact of these experiences in the context of race and gender alike.

But the justified outrage around sexual harassment has eclipsed the discussion on race while borrowing its language. It’s as if America can only care about one injustice at a time, and—once again—white people come first.

“I don’t want to stand overly simplistic, but this is how this country works,” said Rebecca Carroll, a WYNC public radio editor and former journalist on the Charlie Rose show, in a recent interview. “When it involves white people is when it matters.”

The recent scrutiny of sexual misconduct in media, entertainment, tech, and other highly visible industries is justified. Women of color are among the Oscar-winning actors, lawmakers, and tech founders who have come forward with their experiences of harassment and abuse. In fact, women of color are more likely to be targets of sexual harassment than white women, according to a 2016 report from the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

In the last decade, according to an analysis of EEOC data by the Center for American Progress, the industries with the greatest number of sexual harassment claims include hotel and food services, retail, and and health services—all areas where women of color are overrepresented. In 2016, organizers representing hospitality workers in Chicago started an anti-harassment campaign called “Hands Off Pants On” after a survey found that 58% of hotel workers and 77% of casino workers had been sexually harassed by a guest.

“If wealthy, highly visible women in news and entertainment are sexually harassed, assaulted and raped—what do we think is happening to women in retail, food service and domestic work?” wrote Charlene Carruthers, an activist and founder of Black Youth Project 100, on Twitter.

It’s not fair, nor is it even possible, to separate gender from race and class and say, “We’ll get to those later—but first let’s settle this.” Women of color fought the battles that brought society to this point, where even the faint hope of change seems possible. To use that work without ensuring that this broken system is replaced with one inclusive of race, in addition to gender, is not partial victory. It’s complete failure. The US has a long and sordid history of taking the labor of people of color for granted. In this great shakeup, it’s time to put an end to that, too.

Source: https://work.qz.com/1147950/metoo-hijacked-black-womens-work-on-race-and-gender-equality/

Oculus Rift Core 2.0 update is now available in beta
dims?crop=1400%2C933%2C0%2C0&quality=85&Today, Oculus announced that its Rift Core 2.0 VR interface, as well as its redesigned companion desktop app, are available in beta through a free software update -- you just need to opt into the Public Test Channel if you haven't already. This is th...

Source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/12/06/oculus-rift-core-2-update-beta/

Who Is Krampus? | National Geographic

Tagging along with Saint Nicholas, legend tells us this "Christmas Devil" comes to punish children who have misbehaved. Learn about his Germanic origins and how this sinister figure is celebrated.
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About National Geographic:
National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

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Who Is Krampus? | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/HrKL7D7QZRA

National Geographic
https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrKL7D7QZRA

This is What Your Dog Does When You’re Angry | National Geographic

Dogs don't just lick their mouths when they want to be fed, they also use them in a surprising way—when they see an angry human.

➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe

About National Geographic:
National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

Get More National Geographic:
Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite
Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo
Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter
Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta

Researchers showed images of angry humans to dogs, and they reacted with a lick of their mouth. The dogs did not respond in the same way when only given audio queues. This behavior may come from the domestication process—and suggests that dogs have some understanding of human emotions.

This is What Your Dog Does When You're Angry | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/GJrLhu5Uzp8

National Geographic
https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJrLhu5Uzp8

Surprisingly high number of NBA players have heart abnormalities

A surprisingly high number of elite basketball players have heart abnormalities, according to researchers who analyzed data from hundreds of National Basketball Association players. They found that at least 15 percent of players may have heart problems.

Training for a sport at an elite level changes your heart, so a chart of the heart’s electrical activity, called an electrocardiogram (or EKG) for an athlete will be different than one for a non-athlete. As a result, it can be hard to tell if someone’s EKG looks different because of training or because there’s an underlying disorder that might be dangerous. In light of heart-related NBA deaths, coaches and scientists are keen to develop specific criteria that can make heart disease...

Continue reading…

Source: https://www.theverge.com/2017/12/6/16741580/national-basketball-association-sports-heart-disease-safety-training

Flood 1936 Marker in Hartford, Connecticut

A close-up view of the marker.

Extremely tiny and all but forgotten, this last surviving private flood marker on the Polish National Home in Hartford marks how high the waters rose in the Connecticut River flood of 1936.

The Polish National Home, a beautiful Art Deco stone building built in 1930, is flecked with the last known 1936 flood marker. It’s almost impossible to notice, unless one is specifically looking for it. The doors on the front of the building are no longer used, and the marker isn’t legible from the street. 

The marker, which reads “Flood 1936,” is about the size of a quarter. A line in the middle of the small circle represents the height where the water rose. 

Though it's small, the marker commemorates a mighty disaster. In March of 1936, there were unusually strong rains in Hartford and the surrounding areas. The melting snow from an especially harsh winter helped fill the Connecticut River to its bursting point. The resulting flood nearly wiped out the city.

Afterward, President Franklin D. Roosevelt sent the Army Corps of Engineers to the city to build flood walls, channels, and levees. The Flood Control Act of 1936 aimed to make sure such a catastrophic disaster never happened again.

As the floodwaters receded and Hartford rebuilt, memorials were placed on many of the buildings. Individuals marked where the floodwaters rose on their houses and businesses. But, as time went on, those tiny memorials were painted over or lost. Now, decades later, this tiny coin is the only one left.

Source: https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/flood-1936-marker

Time’s 2017 Person of the Year is the “Silence Breakers.” Trump is runner-up.

The women and men of the #MeToo movement are Time’s 2017 Person of the Year.

Time has chosen its 2017 Person of the Year: the Silence Breakers, the women and men who have come forward to shed light on sexual harassment and abuse in America.

The magazine’s editor-in-chief, Edward Felsenthal, made the announcement on NBC’s Today show on Wednesday, citing "the galvanizing actions of the women on our cover.” Those women featured on the cover include actress Ashley Judd, singer Taylor Swift, former Uber engineer Susan Fowler, Visa lobbyist Adama Iwu, Mexican agricultural worker Isabel Pascual, and one woman whose face cannot be seen.

In a statement, Felsenthal also honored the courage of “hundreds of others, and of many men as well, [who] have unleashed one of the highest-velocity shifts in our culture since the 1960s."

The Silence Breakers are TIME's Person of the Year 2017 #TIMEPOY https://t.co/mLgNTveY9z pic.twitter.com/GBo9z57RVG

— TIME (@TIME) December 6, 2017

Judd was one of the first women to come forward with allegations against disgraced movie mogul Harvey Weinstein in early October. Swift made headlines in a court case against former radio DJ David Mueller, who she alleged groped her while taking a picture; Swift won her lawsuit against him, in which she asked for $1 in damages. Fowler spoke out about Uber’s culture of sexual harassment, and Iwu spearheaded a campaign to expose sexual misconduct in California politics. “Isabel Pascual” is a pseudonym for a woman from Mexico who works picking strawberries and was harassed, and was one of the 700,000 female farm workers who marched in solidarity with Hollywood actors against sexual assault in November.

The woman featured to the right of the cover whose face cannot be seen represents the unnamed women — and men — who have come forward anonymously with reports.

It is perhaps ironic that Time’s big reveal took place on Today, which just last week fired longtime host Matt Lauer over allegations of sexual harassment. Multiple women have come forward, and accounts of Lauer’s alleged misconduct have been published by Variety and the New York Times.

Prior to Time’s announcement, Today viewers had selected the #MeToo movement the winner in an online poll of Person of the Year finalists.

Trump, accused of harassment by multiple women, takes the No. 2 spot

The runner-up for this year’s Person of the Year was President Donald Trump, who was Time’s Person of the Year in 2016. He tweeted in November that the magazine had told him he would “probably” be picked again this year but he turned it down.

Time Magazine called to say that I was PROBABLY going to be named “Man (Person) of the Year,” like last year, but I would have to agree to an interview and a major photo shoot. I said probably is no good and took a pass. Thanks anyway!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 24, 2017

Time has disputed his assertion. In its story on this year’s pick, the magazine cites him as a driver of the #MeToo movement, which has seen many people come forward with allegations of harassment and abuse. Time’s story, written by three women — Stephanie Zacharek, Eliana Dockterman, and Haley Sweetland Edwards — cites the now-infamous Access Hollywood tape, in which Trump brags that he could “grab [women] by the pussy,” as a catalyst for changing the way we talk about sexual bad behavior in America:

Discussions of sexual harassment in polite company tend to rely on euphemisms: harassment becomes "inappropriate behavior," assault becomes "misconduct," rape becomes "abuse." We're accustomed to hearing those softened words, which downplay the pain of the experience. That's one of the reasons why the Access Hollywood tape that surfaced in October 2016 was such a jolt. The language used by the man who would become America's 45th President, captured on a 2005 recording, was, by any standard, vulgar. He didn't just say that he'd made a pass; he "moved on her like a bitch." He didn't just talk about fondling women; he bragged that he could "grab 'em by the pussy."

That Trump could say that and still be elected to the White House “is part of what stoked the rage that fueled the Women’s March” the day after his inauguration, Time wrote. The magazine mentions by name some of the women who have clashed with Trump in the past: NBC anchor Megyn Kelly, who asked Trump about his past treatment of women during a Republican presidential debate, and his former Democratic rival Hillary Clinton:

Megyn Kelly, the NBC anchor who revealed in October that she had complained to Fox News executives about Bill O'Reilly's treatment of women, and who was a target of Trump's ire during the campaign, says the tape as well as the tenor of the election turned the political into the personal. "I have real doubts about whether we'd be going through this if Hillary Clinton had won, because I think that President Trump's election in many ways was a setback for women," says Kelly, who noted that not all women at the march were Clinton supporters. "But the overall message to us was that we don't really matter."

So it was not entirely surprising that 2017 began with women donning "pussy hats" and marching on the nation's capital in a show of unity and fury. What was startling was the size of the protest. It was one of the largest in U.S. history and spawned satellite marches in all 50 states and more than 50 other countries.

It also names Summer Zervos, a former contestant on The Apprentice, who is one of about 20 women to have accused Trump of sexual harassment.

And the article takes a swipe at both the Democratic and Republican parties, which are currently grappling with how to handle sexual misconduct allegations in their ranks.

“In the 1990s, feminists stood up for accused abuser Bill Clinton instead of his ­accusers—a move many are belatedly regretting as the national conversation prompts a re-evaluation of the claims against the former President,” Time wrote. “And despite the allegations against Moore, both ­President Trump and the Republican National Committee support him.”

Charlotte Alter, a national correspondent for Time, pointed out on Twitter that this year’s entire Person of the Year project was produced by women.

This was conceived, reported and written by women. It was fact-checked by women. The video was shot and edited by women. The layout and photo spread were designed by women. It's one of the reasons I'm proud to work at @time https://t.co/ekMMIBV0Vc

— Charlotte Alter (@CharlotteAlter) December 6, 2017

Source: https://www.vox.com/identities/2017/12/6/16741324/times-person-of-the-year-silence-breakers

Stickman drawing of school shooting leads to Florida man’s arrest
Complete with the words "Pew, Pew, Pew," the simple sketch depicts a person shooting several other people in front of a school in flames. Robert Paul Alexander Edwards, 33, now faces felony charges.

Source: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/stickman-drawing-school-shooting-student-s-homework-leads-florida-man-n826481?cid=public-rss_20171206

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